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History of ITEI

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15 YEARS AGAINST TORTURE

In 2016 we proudly celebrate 15 years of work in the fight against torture and state violence. We have now spent 15 years providing medical, psychological and legal support to victims, and have taken significant steps to inspire a system to prevent further torture.

CREATION AND INAUGURATION OF ITEI 

The project was born from the initiative of Emma Bolshia Brave and Andrés Gautier. Emma, a Bolivian, was exiled from Bolivia to Chile in 1971, and from Chile to Switzerland in 1973. Andrés, born in Peru, is a Swiss citizen committed to the struggle of Latin American people.
In 1996 they visited Bolivia and made contact with friends who had suffered torture. They were aware of rehabilitation work for those affected by torture that existed in other Latin American centers, and that in Bolivia there was no such institute or center, and so they decided to create ITEI.
The act of founding ITEI was carried out January 25 2001, and the offices were inaugurated August 28 2001, after four years of hard work.

OPTIONAL PROTOCOL OF THE CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE

ITEI, under the guidance of Emma Bolshia Bravo, launched a campaign in February 2003 to get the Bolivian government to sign and ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture. The campaign achieved its goal in December 2005 when the Bolivian government agreed to ratify the Optional Protocol. It was presented to the UN Secretary-General on the 23rd of May 2006 and came into force on the 23 of June the same year.
The Optional Protocol of the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment is an instrument with the objective of preventing torture and maltreatment through a system of regular visits to detention facilities, carried out by independent bodies of an international and national nature.

DRAFT BILL AGAINST TORTURE

ITEI drafted a Bill against Torture and other Cruel, Inhumane or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and a plan to create a National Prevention Mechanism. These were later handed publicly to the then President of the Commission of Human Rights of the House of Representatives, Ms. Marianela Paco. Until now, parliament has yet to pass this law.